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Four more gold coins found in Salvation Army kettles

Shown here is a one-ounce Australian gold coin, one of two found in Salvation Army kettles in Fargo on Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017. Special to The Forum1 / 2
Shown here is one of two one-tenth-ounce gold coins found in Fargo-Moorhead area Salvation Army donation kettles over the Dec. 2-3, 2017, weekend. Special to The Forum2 / 2

FARGO — Four more gold coins have been found locally in Salvation Army kettles, bringing this year's total to five, the group announced Thursday, Dec. 7.

Two one-ounce Australian gold coins were discovered Wednesday, Dec. 6: one at North Dakota State University and another at the Family Fare grocery story, 724 University Drive N., the Salvation Army said.

Over the weekend of Dec. 2-3, two one-tenth-ounce gold coins were donated. The location of those donations was not disclosed, but the Salvation Army estimated their value at $240.

A quarter-ounce gold coin, worth about $300, was found Nov. 29, in a Salvation Army kettle at Sandy's Donuts in downtown Fargo, the organization said earlier.

This is the 15th year that one or more gold coins have been dropped in Salvation Army kettles in the Fargo-Moorhead area.

The 2017 Red Kettle Campaign started Nov. 15. The Salvation Army's goal this year is to raise $900,000 over the holiday season.

Helmut Schmidt

Helmut Schmidt was born in Germany, but grew up in the Twin Cities area, graduating from Park High School of Cottage Grove. After serving a tour in the U.S. Army, he attended the University of St. Thomas in St Paul, Minn., graduating in 1984 with a degree in journalism. He then worked at the Albert Lea (Minn.) Tribune and served as managing editor there for three years. He joined The Forum in October 1989, working as a copy editor until 2000. Since then, he has worked as a reporter on several beats, including education, Fargo city government, business and military affairs. He is currently The Forum's K-12 education reporter.

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